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Wrestling double-team maneuvers

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The double-team maneuvers in [wrestling are executed by two wrestlers instead of one and typically are used by tag teams in tag team matches. Many of these maneuvers are combination of two throws, or submission holds. There is a wide variety of double-team moves in pro wrestling. Most moves are known by the names that professional wrestlers give their "finishing move" (signature moves that usually result in a win) names. Occasionally, these names become popular and are used regardless of the wrestler performing the technique.

Moves are listed under general categories whenever possible.

Aided brainbuster

An aided brainbuster sees one wrestler help another wrestler perform a brainbuster, usually by putting their own weight behind the move to increase its impact. Davey Richards and Super Dragon perform a variation of the aided brainbuster named the Spike D.R. Driver in which Richards positions the opponent for a double underhook brainbuster and Dragon, standing on the second turnbuckle, comes off and catches the opponent's feet to push them down while Richards falls back to connect with the maneuver.

Poetry In Motion

An aided calf kick sees one wrestler whip their opponent into the turnbuckle (or position the opponent on the top turnbuckle) and get down on all fours preceding their partner, who then runs from the opposite turnbuckle, leaps off his partner's back, and perform an aided high elevation calf kick. This is a signature move of the Hardy Boyz Rob Van Dam and Sabu.

Aided dropkick

An aided drop kick sees one wrestler whip their opponent into the turnbuckle (or position the opponent on the top turnbuckle) and get down on all fours. Their partner then runs from the opposite turnbuckle, leaps off his partner's back, and use the momentum to perform an aided high elevation dropkick.

Aided neckbreaker

Any double-team move in which one wrestler helps another to perform a neckbreaker by twisting/forcing the opponent down to the mat harder while a neckbreaker is performed. Another version of an aided neckbreaker, known as an elevated neckbreaker, sees one member of the attacking tag team get the opponent up into an elevated position to allow a wrestler to perform a neckbreaker from a greater height.

Aided whiplash

This is a normal whiplash, but instead of having the opponent held in the air with the aid of the ring rope, he or she is kept in the elevated position by another wrestler. This wrestler has the opponent's legs on his or her shoulders and is facing the first wrestler. When the neckbreaker is performed, the extra wrestler will often twist himself or herself down to the mat and land on top of the opponent. This is perhaps best known as the Au Revoir, a double team move used by Rob Conway and Sylvan Grenier of La Résistance, or as the Tornado-Plex when utilized by TNA's AJ Styles and Tomko.

Argentine rack, neckbreaker combination

This move first sees one wrestler place an opponent in an Argentine backbreaker rack where the opponent is held face-up across both the shoulders of the attacking wrestler. At this point, the second attacking wrestler then grabs the racked opponent's head and, along with the first wrestler, falls to the ground supposedly driving the opponent's head and neck into the mat below. Another variation is when the attacking wrestler falls backwards and the partner then does a cutter on the opponent as he falls face first into the mat.

Assisted Gory neckbreaker

One partner sets the opponent up in a Gory neckbreaker, the other partner then grabs the opponents arms and pulls down on them, forcing the opponent's neck to press against their partners head. Both partners then proceed to drop to a seated or kneeling position there by completing the neckbreaker.

Belly to back suplex, neckbreaker combination

This elevated neckbreaker, also informally known as a 3D-B as named by the Dudley Boyz, is a combination of backdrop or a Back suplex side slam and a neckbreaker. This maneuver sees an opponent get pushed upwards in a belly to back suplex lift by Bubba Ray Dudley then as the opponent falls to the mat D-Von Dudley would apply a headlock neckbreaker forcing the opponent's head into the mat.

Death Drop

The Dudley Death Drop, often shortened to 3-D, is an elevated cutter which sees a combination of a Flapjack and a cutter. While invented by the Dudley Boyz while in ECW. This maneuver sees an opponent get pushed upwards in a flapjack throw by Brother Devon then as the opponent falls to the mat Brother Ray applies a cutter forcing the opponent's head down to the mat. Since the Dudleyz lost the rights to the Dudley name after leaving WWE, the move is now known exclusively as the 3-D.

Fireman's carry, neckbreaker combination

One wrestler (usually the larger one) places an opponent over his or her shoulders in the fireman's carry position while the other attacking wrestler runs and jumps up alongside both men and takes hold/twists the neck of the opponent for any type of neckbreaker slam as the first wrestler falls down to the mat forcing the opponent down with them in a Samoan drop.

This can see the wrestler performing the fireman's carry turn on the spot (an airplane spin) while the other charges at him or her and performs the neckbreaker as he or she spins. Another variation is when someone holds the opponent in a fireman's carry position. His partner then gives the opponent a side headlock and together at the same time, they do a double rolling somersault into a combination of the Rolling fireman's carry slam and the Corkscrew neckbreaker.

German Suplex, neckbreaker combination

One wrestler holds the opponent in a german suplex hold,while another wrestler behind the both of them,once the wrestler performs a German suplex,the wrestler behind performs the neckbreaker.

Gory bomb, cutter combination

One partner sets up a Gory Bomb on the opponent, while his partner stands to the back side of him. When the original partner releases the opponent, the second executes a cutter as the opponent falls. Pro Wrestling Unplugged's All Money Is Legal faction use a Gory bomb & rolling cutter version known as Paid In Full.

Powerbomb, neckbreaker combination

This elevated neckbreaker is performed when one attacking wrestler stands facing a bent over opponent and seizes the opponent around the waist, flipping them over as in a suplex up onto another wrestler's shoulders, leaving them in a prone powerbomb position. The first wrestler keeps hold of the opponent's head at this point, holding it against their shoulder as with a hangman's neckbreaker while keeping the opponent's back and head parallel with the ground. From here the first wrestler falls to a sitting position while the other wrestler who is holding the opponent in the powerbomb position drops to their knees, thus driving the neck of the opponent into the shoulder of this wrestler from an elevated position.

A notable name used in reference to this move is the Villano Breaker, which is named after Villano IV, who was severely injured by a botched version of this move by Kanyon and Raven.

Other variations can see the wrestler get placed in the powerbomb position without the aid of a suplex lift. One such version sees the attacking wrestler skylift an opponent (throw him or her into the air) before catching him or her in the powerbomb neckbreaker as they fall to the mat. The move can be performed using the other powerbomb variations, the Briscoe Brothers perform a crucifix powerbomb variation in which Mark Briscoe lifts the opponent into a crucifix powerbomb while Jay Briscoe runs and jumps to catch the head of the opponent in a neckbreaker as they are thrown by Mark.

Russian legsweep, neckbreaker combination

One partner sets up a Russian legsweep on the victim while the other stands behind the victim and reaches backwards over his shoulder and around the victim's chin with one arm. The first partner completes the Russian legsweep as the second partner sits out, driving the back of the victim's neck against the rear attacker's shoulder.

Wheelbarrow facebuster, cutter combination

This move first sees one wrestler place an opponent in a wheelbarrow facebuster position while the other wrestler applies a three-quarter facelock. One wrestler then drops to his or her back as his or her partner drops to a sit out position performing a cutter and a wheelbarrow facebuster.

Wheelbarrow, double underhook facebuster combination

While one wrestler holds an opponent in a wheelbarrow hold the second wrestler applies a double underhooks and drops to his knees while the other the other wrestler drops to a sitting position impacting the opponents face on the mat.

Aided piledriver

Any double-team move in which one wrestler help another to perform a Piledriver on an opponent by pushing down on the opponent’s feet for more impact. In a variation of the move, the second wrestler jumps off the turnbuckle while pushing the opponent’s feet downward for even more damage, this is well known as a Spike Piledriver (not to be confused with a one-man Spike piledriver). It has also been known under the name Stuffed Piledriver. This move early on was associated with the tag team Brain Busters.

The Briscoe Brothers perform a variation named the Spike J-Driller in which Jay Briscoe positions the opponent for a double underhook piledriver and Mark Briscoe, standing on the apron, springboards off the top rope and catches the opponent's feet to push them down while Jay falls to the sitting position.

Aided powerbomb

Also known as a spike powerbomb, this is any double-team move in which one wrestler help another to perform a Powerbomb, either by aiding the wrestler to get the opponent up on to their shoulders or by pulling down on the opponent as they get dropped down, to force them into the mat harder.

The Acolytes (Faarooq and Bradshaw) were known for doing this double team maneuver, with Faarooq pulling down on an opponent set up in Bradshaw's powerbomb. In seated powerbomb versions, before the first wrestler drops to a seated position the second wrestler will hold on to the opponent and sit down at the same time dropping the opponent between both their legs. Too Cool (who used a Sitout powerbomb) and The Basham Brothers (who used a Chokebomb) where known for performing these double sitout bombs. A variation similar to that of a Device sees a wrestler hit a flying moves (i.e. diving clothesline, diving neckbreaker, seated senton etc.) on an opponent after he/she has been lifted up for the powerbomb (see below).

Aided superbomb

In this version one partner sits on the top rope facing the ring, the second partner stands behind the opponent (both facing the first partner). The second partner then puts his head under one of the opponent's arms and lifts him into the air placing him on the first partners shoulders (the opponent's legs around his neck), from there the first partner stands up and jumps forward Powerbombing the opponent from the second rope down to the ring. Popularized by the Dudley Boyz during their WWE run when they used it on the female valet of another tag team & usually through a table.

Superbomb, neckbreaker slam combination

In this version, the first partner sits on the top rope facing the ring, the second partner stands behind the opponent (both facing the first partner). The second partner then puts his head under one of the opponent's arms and lifts him into the air placing him on the first partners shoulders (the opponent’s legs around his neck). Alternatively, the second partner can lift the opponent up in a fireman's carry, then flip the opponent's legs to the first partner. Then the second partner holds onto the neck of the opponent and runs forward while dropping down for a neckbreaker slam while first partner on the turnbuckle simultaneously jumps forward in a seated position superbombing the opponent with extra force from the second rope down to the ring. This move is used by The Hardys and it's call The Rapture.

Powerbomb, diving attack combination

One wrestler sets up the opponent for a powerbomb with his back to a turnbuckle while his partner climbs that same turnbuckle. The first attacking wrestler then holds the opponent at the apex of the powerbomb while the second dives off the top rope and impacts the opponent with an aerial attack, driving the opponent backwards and completing the partner's powerbomb with added force. Certain attacks can also be timed so that, instead of hitting the opponent at the apex of the move, they can impact at the exact moment the powerbomb impacts the opponent on the floor.

Like all the below variations, this move does not have to see the second attacking wrestler dive from the turnbuckle it can be performed from any elevated surface, or alternatively the wrestler could springboard off the ring ropes to gain height.

Powerbomb, diving legdrop combination

One wrestler sets up the opponent for a powerbomb with his back to a turnbuckle while his partner climbs that same turnbuckle. The first attacking wrestler then holds the opponent at the apex of the powerbomb while the second dives off the top rope and impacts the opponent with a diving leg drop just as the victim himself lands on the mat, crushing his neck, face, or chest. The leg drop can sometimes be a somersault variation. This move was popularized by The Headbangers, who called it the Stage Dive.

Powerbomb, double knee backbreaker combination

One wrestler sets up the opponent for a powerbomb while his partner is positioned in front of him. The partner then leaps upwards grabbing the opponent from behind by the chin and pulling him down into a double knee backbreaker while the first wrestler delivers the powerbomb.

Powerbomb, flying neckbreaker combination

One wrestler sets up the opponent for a powerbomb with his back to a turnbuckle while his partner climbs that same turnbuckle. The first attacking wrestler then holds the opponent at the apex of the powerbomb while the second dives off the top rope and impacts the opponent with a flying neckbreaker, driving the opponent backwards and finishing the powerbomb with extra force.

Powerbomb, missile dropkick combination

One wrestler sets up the opponent for a powerbomb with his back to a turnbuckle while his partner climbs that same turnbuckle. The first attacking wrestler then holds the opponent at the apex of the powerbomb while the second dives off the top rope and impacts the opponent with a missile dropkick, driving the opponent backwards and finishing the powerbomb with extra force.

Powerbomb, shiranui combination

This Device variation sees one of the wrestlers lift the opponent onto his shoulders, into the powerbomb position, while standing with his back to the corner turnbuckles. Another wrestler then climbs to the top turnbuckle, faces away from the ring, and grabs a three-quarter facelock on the opponent, performing a Shiranui, while the other wrestler slams the opponent down.

Aided splash

This move starts with both partners on either the right or left side of an opponent who is lying prone on the mat, face-up, with one partner in front of the other and both of them facing away from the opponent. The one closest to the opponent picks up the other partner, who is facing away from him/her, and makes a 180° turn before dropping the partner on the opponent. The wrestler can lift his partner in a variety of ways (military press, wheelbarrow suplex, etc.) before dropping him on the opponent.

Another variation starts with both partners on either the right or left side of an opponent who is lying prone on the mat, face-up, with one partner in front of the other and both of them facing away from the opponent. The one closest to the opponent performs a military press on the other partner and before trowing them, while the other opponent performs a 360° Splash.

Aided suplex

Any double-team move in which one wrestler help another to perform a suplex, usually by putting their own weight behind the move to increase its impact.

Aided wheelbarrow suplex

This move sees one wrestler wrap a forward facing opponent's legs around his/her waist and apply a gutwrench hold to lift the opponent up off the ground. His partner then steps in front of both wrestlers and grabs either the victim's arms or shoulders and yanks them upward, just as the first attacker throws himself and the victim backwards in a wheelbarrow suplex. This increases the momentum with which the victim is thrown backwards on his upper back, neck, and head.

Power-Plex

This was the finishing move of the tag team known as Power and Glory (Hercules Hernandez and Paul Roma). Hercules would take an opponent and sit him on the top turnbuckle (as to set up a superplex) near his partner Roma. When Hercules set up the opponent and was ready to perform the superplex, he would tag in Roma. Roma would run to the next turnbuckle and climb up. As Hercules executed the superplex, Roma would fly off the top turnbuckle with a splash, timing the landing on the opponent so that he would hit immediately after Hercules landed. The most notable Power-Plex was performed on Hulk Hogan at the 1990 Survivor Series.

Total Nonstop Action Wrestling's Triple X called their powerbomb / neckbreaker combination move the Power-Plex.

Backbreaker hold, diving elbow drop combination

One wrestler would hit a pendulum backbreaker and hold the opponent over his knee as another wrestler jumped down to hit the opponent with a diving elbow drop from the middle or top rope to his exposed head or chest, flipping the opponent over down to the mat. This move was known as the Demolition Decapitation (also given the name The Demolisher) when it was used by Demolition in the WWF, and as such it (and variations of it) are often such is still called by this name today.

Backbreaker hold, top-rope legdrop combination

One wrestler would hold the opponent over his knee, in a backbreaker position as another wrestler jumped down to hit the opponent with a top-rope leg drop to his exposed head, flipping the opponent over down to the mat. Known as Cutting The Cheese when Steve Blackman & Al Snow teamed together.

Battering ram

One wrestler stands behind his partner and leans forward, placing his head underneath his partner's arm, in a headlock. The two then charge forward, ramming the head of the rear wrestler into the opponent. The move was named and made famous by The Bushwhackers. There is also a single person version of the move.

Bearhug hold, attack combination

One of a number of double team moves in which one parter holds the victim in a bearhug while the other partner either runs or dives at the elevated victim and impacts him in the chest, neck, or face, driving him backwards into the ground in the process. As a variant of the bearhug/attack combination, the holding wrestler can instead use a spinebuster, driving the opponent down instead of releasing them.

Bearhug hold, flying crossbody combination

One wrestler would apply a bearhug and elevate the opponent while the other wrestler executed a flying body press from the top rope, driving the opponent to the ground from an elevated height.

Bearhug hold, high kick combination

One wrestler would apply a bearhug and elevate the opponent while the other wrestler executed a high dropkick (as popularized by Mark Jindrak and Garrison Cade), or other high kicks as the first wrestler drops the opponent to the ground, such as with Booker T's high side kick with tag partner Goldust, or Stevie Ray of Harlem Heat they named the move the Big Apple Blast. Deuce 'n Domino also use a variation of this move, which they call the West Side Stomp. During this move, Domino applies a bearhug and Deuce executes a jumping heel kick enzuigiri.

Bearhug hold, seated senton combination

One wrestler would apply a bearhug to the victim while his or her partner climbed the turnbuckle behind them. The second partner then dived off the turnbuckle, performering a seated senton on the victim, driving him out of his partner's arms and into the mat. This move is commonly referred to as the Cannonball crash and was popularized by the Fabulous Rougeaus and later used by The Quebecers.

Bearhug hold, superkick, jackknife pin combination

One wrestler would apply a bearhug while the other wrestler executed a superkick to the face of the opponent. The opponent would fall backwards, and the partner applying the bearhug would roll forward with their momentum, flipping over into a bridge position, holding both legs and ending up in a Jackknife pinning position. The now defunct team of Charlie Haas & Shelton Benjamin used this move as their double team finisher.

Bearhug hold, top-rope legdrop combination

Commonly referred to as the Veg-O-Matic, also referred to as an Aided guillotine legdrop. In this move one wrestler would apply a bearhug and hold the opponent out as another wrestler jumped down to hit the opponent with a top-rope leg drop to his exposed head or torso, forcing the opponent hard back down to the mat. It was previously used by Chris Harris & James Storm when they teamed together in TNA when they named it as The Death Sentence, occasionally using a super version when Chris Harris would dive from the top of a cage to execute the leg drop part.

Hart Attack

Technically known as a Bearhug, lariat combination, this was the traditional finishing move of The Hart Foundation (Bret Hart and Jim Neidhart). Neidhart would lift up the opponent in a bearhug in the center of the ring, while Hart leaned against the ringside ropes, facing the opponent's back. Hart would then run past the two and bounce off the ropes on the opposite side of the ring. On his return, Hart would make a running leap and perform a lariat takedown on the opponent as Neidhart let go of him, resulting in both Hart and the opponent falling onto their backs. Hart sometimes did the lariat takedown from the second corner rope. Strangely, this move was never referred to by name on TV. In fact, when the Hart Foundation used it to win the WWF Tag Team Titles, commentator Jesse Ventura called it simply, "the Hart Clothesline". The name Hart Attack comes from a WWF trading card of that era.

Con-chair-to

This move was popularized and named by the team of Edge and Christian, and consists of a double steel folding chair shot to the head of an opponent, one from either side hitting the back of the head and the face of an opponent simultaneously. Edge and Christian often slammed the chairs on the mat to "tune up the band" before hitting the opponent. There is also a one man version of the move known as a one man con-chair-to where the opponent's head is lying on a chair on the mat and the attacker slams another chair on their head. The name of the move is derived from the musical term "concerto". Since their split, Edge and Christian have both used the one-man version frequently as heels, which also carried onto Randy Orton for the time he spent as Edge's partner in Rated-RKO.

Doomsday Device

Main article: Doomsday Device

A move in which one wrestler hoists the opponent on his shoulders in the electric chair position, while another wrestler climbs to the top turnbuckle and delivers a flying attack on the prone opponent, often resulting in the opponent doing a backflip and landing on their front. This move was made famous by the tag team known as the Road Warriors, but also used by Team 3D.

Double bulldog

A double bulldog is when two wrestlers both hit a bulldog on a single opponent. It can also refer to two bulldogs being performed by one wrestler on two opponents at the same time.

Double cutter

A double cutter is a common term which refers to double team variations of the three-quarter facelock bulldog maneuver (known as a "cutter"). This move sees the attacking wrestlers first stand either side of an opponent and apply a three-quarter facelock (reaching behind the head of an opponent, thus pulling the opponent's jaw above each of the wrestler's shoulders) before both (moving forwards and) falling backwards to force the opponent face first to the mat below. However, due to the face lock the opponent's face often never reaches the mat, instead lands on the shoulders of the attacking wrestlers. Rated-RKO used a variation known as the Double RKO, where both wrestlers performed a jumping cutter on a single opponent. The Jersey Triad (Diamond Dallas Page, Bam Bam Bigelow & Kanyon) also used a version where Bigelow held the opponent stomach-first over his shoulder & then fall forwards as DDP applied the cutter.

Double chokeslam

When two wrestlers execute a chokeslam on a single opponent at the same time it is referred to as a double chokeslam. Due to convenience of wording, a double chokeslam can also refer to two chokeslams being performed by one wrestler on two opponents at the same time (i.e.; single person double chokeslam), and occasionally in a tag team match where each member of one team will chokeslam a member of the opposing team (i.e.; two person simultaneous chokeslams) which can also be referred to as stereo chokeslams. Another variation of the move, done by Kane, Big Show, and The Undertaker, is the triple chokeslam, where both of the wrestlers chokeslam a single opponent and each simultaneously chokeslam another opponent alone with their free hands. The traditional version is also referred to as a double spinebuster / double front slam as the action of lifting an opponent up and throwing them down are much the same, though the spinebuster, and front slam are more common on a charging opponent.

Double clothesline

Two wrestlers both hitting a clothesline on a single opponent by joining hands is referred to as a double clothesline. A variation has both wrestlers charging from opposite sides of a single opponent with a clothesline. A double clothesline can also refer to two clotheslines being performed by one wrestler on two opponents at the same time.

Double crucifix powerbomb

This two man version of a crucifix powerbomb sees a single opponent lifted up between two wrestlers so that the opponent is being lifted by their spread out arms. At the apex of the move where the opponent is raised to the highest point it will look as though he/she had been crucified at this point the attacking wrestlers then kneel, and bends forwards, to throw the opponent forward to the mat on to their back or neck and shoulders. Most commonly used by The Backseat Boyz calling it the T-Gimmick.

Double DDT

When two wrestlers both hit a DDT on a single opponent by standing either side of the opponent and applying the front facelock before hitting the move. This move can see more than one opponent be headlocked, using the wrestlers free arms, to become a seemingly indefinite line of wrestlers and opponents all linked together. A double DDT can also refer to two DDTs being performed by one wrestler on two opponents at the same time. Another reference, also known as Stereo DDTs, sees two wrestlers performing a DDT on two different people at the same time.

Double inverted DDT

This is similar to a normal double DDT only that they are in an inverted headlock and drop them in the back of the head.

Double lifting DDT

This is similar to a normal double DDT except for the fact that both wrestlers jump and lift the opponent. Also known as a Double Edgecution.

Double shiranui

This double team DDT sees two attacking wrestlers perform the shiranui (three-quarter facelock backflip diving reverse DDT) variation on one single opponent, with each wrestler applying the three-quarter facelock from opposing sides of the opponent. Like the shiranui, this double team version can be performed from both a standing and elevated position.

Double dropkick

When two wrestlers simultaneously hit a dropkick on a single opponent. Attacking wrestlers may both target the front or back of the opponent, or sometimes "sandwich" the opponent by dropkicking them from either side.

Double missile dropkick

Similar to the double dropkick, both wrestlers execute missile dropkicks from adjacent turnbuckles onto a single opponent. Timing is of the utmost importance when executing this move; at the 2003 Royal Rumble, Rey Mysterio and Edge attempted this move on Christopher Nowinski. Mysterio jumped too early, and Edge landed on the face of a supine Nowinski, which eventually resulted in Nowinski suffering a career-ending concussion.

Double drop toe-hold

In a double drop toe-hold two wrestlers hit a drop toe-hold on each leg of a single opponent.

Double elbow drop

This is a double team maneuver which involves two wrestlers hitting a variations of a elbow drop (standing, or flying) on one person at the same time. Often this move sees two wrestlers knock down a charging opponent leaving the opponent in a position in which both wrestlers can stand either side of the fallen opponent and before elbow drops. These elbow drops are often preceded by some sort of dance/taunt or the joining of hands.

Double enzuigiri

This is a double team maneuver in which both attacking wrestlers will perform and Ensiguri on a single opponent, each from different sides. This move is most often used by the Motor City Machine Guns.

Double extreme leg drop

This move, innovated, named and popularized by the Hardy Boyz, sees one wrestler (Matt) climb to the top turnbuckle while his partner (Jeff) holds up their opponent's legs (The opponent in question is obviously perpendicular to the wrestler on the top rope). Then, the wrestler on the top rope performs a leg drop on the opponent's neck while his partner performs an extreme leg drop (double leg drop to the groin/lower-abdominal area) at the same time.

Double fireman's carry

Two wrestlers both lift a single opponent up into a fireman's carry leaving the two wrestlers back-to-back with the opponent across their shoulders is called a double fireman's carry. From Here the two wrestlers can perform a double version of a fireman's carry slam, the wrestlers can also both fall backwards down to the mat dropping the opponent face-first into the canvas in a double flapjack type move.

Double flapjack

Two wrestlers throw a single opponent up into a flapjack. In this move both wrestlers would push the opponent upward by reaching under their legs and lifting them into the air, while remaining the hold on the opponent’s legs the wrestlers would fall backwards, dropping the opponent front-first into the canvas. Another basic double flapjack is similar to a back drop, in which the wrestlers push the opponent upwards and release him/her so that they fall onto their face instead of falling back-first.

Double hip toss

When two wrestlers both hit a hip toss on a single opponent by both wrestlers underhooking the closest arm and then quickly lifting the opponent up and throwing him/her forward, flipping the opponent onto his/her back.

Catching hip toss

As two wrestlers hit the hip toss on a single opponent, both wrestlers catch the legs of the opponent as he/she flips over so that both have a hold of one arm and leg of their opponent.From this position the wrestlers can lift the opponent up into the air and drop them onto the mat, or lift the opponent up and drop to a kneeling position so that the opponent would drop onto their knees. This double team move is more common with, lighter wrestlers or wrestlers with an old school style.

Double STO

This move can either be a Double STO when two wrestlers both hit a STO on a single opponent at the same time, or an Aided STO, known in Japan as Oregatokare, or "rage dragon slayer" where one wrestler help another wrestler to perform the STO, usually by sweeping out the legs from under the opponent. An inverted variation also exists.

Double submission

This term applies to any instance when attacking wrestlers lock an opponent in simultaneous submission holds.

The most popular instance of this occurred when Chris Jericho (using his Walls of Jericho) worked with Chris Benoit (using his Crippler Crossface) to wear down an opponent.

Obviously many variations exist in which most commonly one wrestler will work on the lower body/legs with moves like the Sharpshooter, the Texas cloverleaf and the reverse figure four, while the other wrestler works on the upper half/head with moves like the camel clutch.

Double superkick

A tandem attack where two wrestlers stand in front of an opponent and hit him/her in the face/head with a high, side thrust kick, known as a Superkick. The move was popularized by The Rockers, and due to the minimal usage of the term superkick (which was trademarked by Chris Adams), wrestling announcers in the WWF would call the maneuver a double crescent kick when used by The Rockers.

The name can also refer to what is known as Stereo Superkicks when two wrestlers both perform superkicks to two different opponents at the same time.

Adams and Savannah Jack also used the double superkick in the UWF; with Savannah Jack using the thrust kick with his left foot, and Adams with his right foot.

Double suplex

A throw in which two wrestlers will both suplex one opponent at the same time is called double suplex. The most common suplexs used for this double team move are the Snap and Vertical variations, in which the wrestlers apply a front face lock to the opponent, draping the opponent’s near arm over their respective shoulders, at this point the wrestlers will either pull their own legs back and kick them forward quickly slamming them to the ground to build momentum to fall backwards and flip the opponent over them so they all land on their backs for a double snap suplex. In a double vertical suplex the move is the same except that when the opponent is in position he/she is lifted up and held upside-down before the wrestlers fall backwards.

A double suplex can also refer to two suplexes being performed by one wrestler on two opponents at the same time, although this move is much rarer and typically requires a larger wrestler to suplex two smaller wrestlers often as a counter to a standard double suplex.

Double belly to back suplex

The attackers stand behind the opponent on either side of him and put their heads under his arms. They then lift the opponent up using their arms wrapped around his torso. The attackers finally fall backwards and drop the opponent flat on his back or, occasionally (and as often done by Rhythm & Blues), on the back of his head.

Double inverted suplex

The attackers stand behind an opponent and each applies an inverted facelock with his or her inside arm, and uses the other arm to aid in elevating the opponent so that he/she is lifted up and held upside-down before the attackers fall to their backs driving the opponent down to the mat front-first, behind the attackers. A slingshot variation is also possible.

Elevated DDT

An elevated DDT is any double team move that sees one wrestler keep an opponent suspended in an elevated position so that another wrestler can perform a DDT and drop the opponent from the raised position. one variation sees a wrestler apply a front facelock to an opponent and lift them so that their legs are placed on the top of the shoulders of another wrestler, and this point the first wrestler quickly throws himself to the ground backwards so that the opponent is forced to dive forward onto his/her head with extra force because of the height of which they are dropped. This is an aided version of the one-man elevated DDT.

Belly to back suplex, inverted DDT combination

This elevated DDT, is a combination of backdrop and an inverted DDT. This maneuver sees an opponent get pushed upwards in a belly to back suplex lift by one attacking wrestler then as the opponent falls to the mat the second attacking wrestler would apply the inverted headlock forcing the opponent's head into the mat.

Flapjack DDT

One of the most common double team elevated DDT is known as a Flapjack DDT, a combination of Flapjack and a DDT. This maneuver sees an opponent get pushed upwards in air during a flapjack attempted then just as the opponent falls to the mat the wrestlers partner will put opponent in a front facelock and as all three fall down to the mat the DDT will ensure the opponent is forced to dive forward onto his own head. MNM used this move efficiently in matches calling it The Snapshot often finishing matches with it. Simon Diamond & Johnny Swinger used when they wrestled for ECW & calling it "The Problem Solver".

Sidewalk slam, headlock takedown

This move involves one wrestler setting up an opponent for a sidewalk slam will the opponent is held in the air his head is exposed at this point another wrestler will be able to perform many moves that only involve the attack of that exposed head (i.e. reverse DDT variations, headlock takedowns, and neckbreakers) these moves force the opponent down harder to the mat when the first wrestler drops him/her.

A variation used by the team of Edge & Christian, saw Christian hit his signature falling reverse DDT on an opponent that Edge held in the sidewalk slam. Another variation used by the team of The Hurricane and Rosey, saw The Hurricane hit his Eye of the Hurricane finisher on an opponent that Rosey held in the sidewalk slam.

Elevated jawbreaker

With an opponent kept up in an elevated position by one wrestler, another wrestler has chance to drop the opponent into any type of jawbreaker from a raised height. Most notably this sees the opponent's legs being held on the shoulders of one wrestler while another wrestler catches hold of the head of this opponent. At this point the wrestler will lock a hold onto the head of the opponent and drop them into the jawbreaker.

One known as the Natural Disaster, as named by The Naturals (Chase Stevens and Andy Douglas), sees one wrestler use an inverted suplex to raise their opponent off the ground and onto the shoulders of their partner behind them. Both wrestlers then drop to a kneeling/sitting position, so that the wrestler at the front can hit the stunner style jawbreaker.

Elevated splash

This is where one wrestler (usually a larger wrestler) backs up to the corner turnbuckles and allows another wrestler to climb the turnbuckle then up onto his/her shoulders, this wrestler then jumps off to perform any type of diving splash (i.e. Shooting star press) on a supine opponent. Sometimes this move sees the first wrestler climb up on the turnbuckle himself getting even higher before the second wrestler gets up there and jumps off him.

High and Low

A "high and low" double team maneuver is a type of takedown that sees two wrestlers hit a combination of attacks on a standing opponent; one aimed to hit high, while the other is aimed low. The high attack usually comes from in front of the opponent, while the low attack comes from behind, sending the opponent back-first into the mat with greater force.

Lariat, running chop block combination

The attacking wrestlers stand on opposite sides of an opponent (front and back). The wrestler facing the front then executes a running lariat while the wrestler from behind executes a running chop block knocking the opponent backwards.

This manoeuver was popularized by Lance Cade and Trevor Murdoch during their WWE run.

Superkick, spinning leg sweep combination

Both wrestlers stand facing a standing opponent. One wrestler executes a spinning leg sweep to the back of the opponent's legs, and the other executes a superkick towards the opponent simultaneously, knocking the opponent backwards.

Total Elimination

This high and low move, named and popularized by The Eliminators (Perry Saturn and John Kronus), sees both wrestlers stand facing a standing opponent before Saturn executes a spinning leg sweep to the back of the opponent's legs, and Kronus executes a spinning heel-kick towards the opponent simultaneously, knocking the opponent backwards.

Leapfrog body guillotine

Also called a Leapfrog Stun Gun, this move, best known as a signature move of The World's Greatest Tag Team, sees an opponent rest with his upper body on the ropes and his feet on one of the attacking wrestler's shoulders while the other wrestler charges at his partner, leapfroging over him/her and straddling the opponent's lower back.

Leg drop, splash combination

This type of combination sees two wrestlers simultaneously execute any type of splash and leg drop on one prone opponent lying on the mat. However, the double team move is not limited to grounded variations of splashes and leg drops many wrestlers utilize aerial versions, or versions where one of the two attacks come from an elevated position.

The most common all elevated version of this, known as the Event Omega, popularized by the Hardy Boyz, sees the opponent lying prone on the mat while both wrestlers climb on opposite turnbuckles or occasionally ladders, and come down simultaneously with a diving leg drop and a diving splash. While alternatively, another version, known as Chris Chetti and Nova's Tidal Wave, sees both wrestlers climb the same turnbuckle before hitting the move.

Poetry in Motion

This move, innovated, named and popularized by the Hardy Boyz, sees one wrestler either place his opponent or Irish whip his opponent into the turnbuckle. The same wrestler then gets down on all fours and their partner runs from the opposite side of the ring/opposite turnbuckle, leap off his partner's back, and perform an aided splash/calf kick/heel kick/leg lariat/dropkick or in some rare instances, a leg drop on the opponent. A one man version sees the use of a chair (or chairs), instead of the partner, and perform the attack. If the move is done with a chair in hand, it is usually a dropkick version, with the attacker driving the chair into his opponent. Rob Van Dam and Sabu also use this maneuver, calling it Air Sabu, although it only comes in the calf kick/heel kick/leg lariat variants. Edge and Christian used a running splash/vertical crossbody variation in their matches with the Hardy Boyz to mock them, a variation of this move was also used by CIMA and Naruki Doi where CIMA performed a Bronco Buster and Naruki finished it with a Low Dropkick

A notable one man variation (used by Jeff Hardy during his time in Total Nonstop Action Wrestling) sees the user run up a ladder leaned against the torso of their opponent and perform a dropkick.

Prone low blow

This is a double team move in which one wrestler will set up an opponent so that his partner can perform a low blow.

Diving headbutt low blow

While one wrestler slams an opponent and spreads their legs apart the other wrestler would climb the turnbuckle and perform a diving headbutt into the opponent's groin. This is mostly associated with the Dudley Boyz who popularized the move coining it the Whassup?, based on the Budweiser commercials.

Diving leg drop low blow

While one wrestler slams an opponent and spreads their legs apart the other wrestler would climb the turnbuckle and perform a diving leg drop into the opponent's groin or face or chest this move is usually performed by the Hardy Boyz, to copy the Whassup? done by the Dudley Boyz.

Reverse STO, enzuigiri combination

In this combination one wrestler prepares to deliver a reverse STO to an opponent and then while holding them in position their partner delivers an enzuigiri kick to the back of the head of the opponent who is then dropped for the reverse STO driving them down to the mat face-first with the added momentum of the kick. Known as Get Well Soon when Paul London & Brian Kendrick team together.

Rocket Launcher

One wrestler ascends the top turnbuckle. Their partner then stands below them and reaches up, taking hold of them. The wrestler on the top rope then performs a flying body splash, with their partner throwing them, thus increasing their range and height. This move was innovated and named by The Midnight Express team of "Beautiful" Bobby Eaton and "Loverboy" Dennis Condrey. It was also used by the New Foundation tag team of Jim Neidhart and Owen Hart. The team of Jesse and Festus use a variation of this move, with a shoulder block instead of a flying body splash. Currently, the tag team of Enzo Amore and Colin Cassady, (The Realest Guys) also use the Rocket Launcher as their double team finishing move, renamed as Bada-Boom Shakalaka.

Assisted senton

One of the wrestlers ascends the top turnbuckle. Their partner then stands below them and reaches up, taking hold of them. The wrestler on the top rope then performs a Senton bomb, with their partner throwing them, thus increasing their range and height.

Russian legsweep, clothesline combination

One wrestler would begin a Russian legsweep as another wrestler hit the opponent with a clothesline, forcing the opponent hard back down to the mat.

Sidewalk slam, top-rope legdrop combination

One wrestler would perform a Sidewalk slam, and then their partner would perform a top-rope legdrop on the prone, supine opponent. This move was popularized by The Smoking Gunns, who called it the Sidewinder. A slight variation of this sees the wrestler stay grounded instead of ascending to the top turnbuckle, performing a jumping legdrop on the opponent rather than a top rope one.

Sky lift slam

This move first sees the two attacking wrestlers standing either side of an opponent and hook their arms under the legs and arms of their side to elevated the opponent. From this position, the wrestlers then force the opponent upwards, throwing them up while releasing the hold to allow the opponent to fall and slam into the mat back-first.This move can also be done by one wrestler using the corner as the tag team partner.

The five-wrestler team known as Spirit Squad used a variation dubbed the High Spirits in which each of the attacking wrestlers stood over a fallen opponent and grabbed hold of a limb/extremity. From here, the wrestlers would all lift at once; throwing the opponent into the air before releasing the hold of the limbs to allow gravity to pull the opponent, back first, down to the mat.

Slingshot catapult, attack combination

The first wrestler performs a slingshot catapult on the opponent sending them towards their partner while their partner performs an attack on the prone opponent, knocking them back down with greater force.

Slingshot catapult, clothesline combination

The first wrestler performs a slingshot catapult on the opponent sending them towards their partner while their partner sticks their arm out and does a clothesline, knocking the opponent down.

Other variations use variants of the clothesline like the more impactful Lariat, or the partner goes to the top rope and performs a clothesline off the top rope

Slingshot catapult, missile dropkick combination

The first wrestler performs a slingshot catapult on his or her opponent, sending them flying towards the opposite turnbuckle. His or her partner then jumps off that turnbuckle and delivers a missile dropkick to the opponent in midair.

Slingshot catapult, top rope bulldog combination

The first wrestler performs a slingshot catapult in an attempt to throw the opponent away from the corner turnbuckle away from where the second wrestler is situated. As the opponent is lifted off the ground up into the apex of the throw, the second wrestler dives off the turnbuckle and performs a diving bulldog on that same opponent forcing his/her head down into the mat.

Spanish fly

This variation of the moonsault side slam is performed while all three wrestlers are on the top turnbuckle. The wrestlers stand either side, slightly behind, and facing the front of a standing opponent, the wrestlers then reach under the near arms of the opponent, across the chest and under the opponent far arm, while placing their other hands on the back of the opponent to hold them in place. The wrestlers then perform a moonsault while holding the opponent, driving the opponent into the ground back-first in a side slam position.

Stack-superplex

A variation of the superplex (a vertical suplex off the top turnbuckle) in which the wrestler delivering the suplex sits upon the shoulders of another wrestler rather than standing on the ring ropes/turnbuckles where the opponent is situated. At the apex of the suplex, the lower wrestler allows himself to fall backwards, increasing the power and momentum of the other wrestler's maneuver.

A multi person variation, commonly known as the Tower of Doom, first sees an attacking wrestler climb the turnbuckles as if to perform a superplex on an opponent situated on the top turnbuckle, or in some case two wrestlers attempt a double superplex on the single opponent. However, at this point one or more wrestlers stand under the elevated wrestlers and hold them as if to perform a powerbomb; slamming them to the mat as they pull the other wrestler off the top.

STO, Big boot combination

This move requires one person standing in front of the opponent, while the other runs towards the held opponent. The running wrestler will deliver a big boot / running big boot, and the wrestler in front will then deliver an STO aided by the momentum of the kick.

STO, German suplex combination

This move requires one person standing behind the opponent, while one stands in front. The wrestler in front will deliver an STO, and the wrestler behind the opponent will perform a German Suplex on the same opponent. It has been known in Japan as the Rage Dragon Slayer.

STO, Russian legsweep combination

This move requires one person standing behind the opponent, while one stands in front. The wrestler in front will deliver an STO, and the wrestler behind the opponent will perform a Russian legsweep on the same opponent.

Superkick-Plex

This combination move sees one wrestler hit a superkick to the chin of an opponent who is being held in a belly-to-back position by the second wrestler. The second wrestler uses the thrust of the superkick to aid in executing a bridging German suplex for a pinfall attempt. This move is not to be confused with a superplex, which is a suplex from the top turnbuckle. Paul Diamond and Pat Tanaka are the well-known users of this finisher (as Badd Company in the AWA and the Orient Express in the WWE).

Suplex, 450° splash combination

While standing next to and with his back to a downed opponent, one of the attacking wrestlers performs a vertical suplex lift on their own partner where at the apex of the suplex the first wrestler releases the suplex and the second uses the altitude and rotation to perform a 450° splash onto the downed opponent.

Suplex, flying attack combination

One wrestler would apply a stalling vertical suplex and elevate the opponent while the other wrestler executed a flying attack like a flying crossbody block or a missile dropkick from the top rope, driving the opponent to the ground from an elevated height.

Wheelbarrow hold, top rope legdrop combination

This move sees one wrestler wrap a forward facing opponent's legs around his/her waist and apply a gutwrench hold to lift the opponent up off the ground. At this point another wrestler, who is situated on the top turnbuckle would then jump down to hit the opponent with a top-rope leg drop to the back of his exposed head, forcefully driving the opponent's face and body back down to the mat. Danny Doring & Amish Roadkill used this move when they held the ECW World Tag Team Championship calling it the Buggy Bang.

Wishbone

This move, which is named after the tradition of pulling on a wishbone, sees two wrestlers each take hold of an opponent's leg (who is lying face up on the mat) and yank them in opposite directions stretching out the groin area.

Sweet Chin Music Into Pedigree

As seen with Dx HBK does a Sweet Chin Music and that makes the opponent spin around and then HHH does the Pedigree. On Raws 800th episode John Morrision and The Miz tried to mimic it but HHH reversed the Pedigree from The Miz to do Sweet Chin into Pedigree With Shawn

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