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Vertical Suplex

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What is called the vertical suplex in the western world, it is known as a Brainbuster in Japan. The Western wrestling term Brainbuster is known as a vertical brainbuster or sheer drop brainbuster in Japan.

In a set up similar to a snap suplex, the attacking wrestler applies a front face lock to his/her opponent, draping the opponent's near arm over his/her shoulder, when the opponent is in position he/she is lifted up to an upside-down position before the attacking wrestler falls backwards slamming the opponents back into the mat. Eddie Guerrero used the move as one of his signature maneuvers in which, after falling to the ground with his opponent, he swung his legs and flipped himself over while maintaining his hold, pulled the opponent back into the original position, and performed two more vertical suplexes. WWE announcers have dubbed the sequence the Three Amigos.

Delayed vertical suplex

This variation of a vertical suplex, also known as the hanging suplex, standing suplex or stalling suplex, sees the attacking wrestler holds an opponent in the upside-down position at the peak of the arc for several seconds before completing the maneuver, thereby (in kayfabe) causing blood to pool into the head of the opponent. This move is a staple of larger and powerful wrestlers as it gives an aura of dominance over their opponents who can do nothing but wait to drop in the suplex.

The British Bulldog used the maneuver regularly, and was noted for perfecting the technique. Bobby Lashley uses only one arm to perform the suplex while using to other to tell the crowd to cheer. Scott Steiner and other brute-force wrestlers have been known to perform deep knee bends while holding up their opponents to demonstrate their physical strength. This move is often confused, or mislabeled with the Jackhammer, which is associated with Goldberg.

Rotating vertical suplex

This variation of a vertical suplex, is also sometimes known as the rotation suplex, Twisting suplex and Rotary suplex, sees the attacking wrestler lift the opponent as in a normal vertical suplex, but turn around as he or she falls back to twist the opponent into the mat.

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